Membership

Membership Information

  • Interested in prototype railway modelling?
  • Interested in the CPR or northern Ontario railroading?
  • Wish to join in realistic operating sessions?
  • You’re new to the hobby, or an armchair modeller who wishes to get seriously involved?

If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then you should consider joining the WRMRC.

Why Join the WRMRC?

Obviously we offer the same major benefit that all other clubs do in building a larger layout than is possible by any individual owner. However there are many differences which the WRMRC offers over the traditional model railroad club. The most important aspect of the WRMRC is that clear and defined goals have been set. Having goals and modelling objectives firmly established helps to limit club politics, so we can spend more time modelling, building, operating and having fun.

If I have no interest in Canadian Pacific, the 70s or northern Ontario modelling, why should I join?

The founders of the WRMRC understood that setting a specific railway, era, and location (versus the usual club freelanced theme) would limit membership numbers, yet we continually attract new members that have little interest in CP, Sudbury or the 1970s. How? There is an attraction to modelling something that is real, or at least was real at some point in the past. Regardless of differences in railway interests, all the our members recognize some good reasons for being part of the WRMRC:

  • Clear goals and set standards result in a superior layout, both in operation and appearance.
  • Without such standards construction becomes haphazard and unmotivated.
  • No conflicts in modelling direction regardless of changes in membership.
  • Dedication of members to the good of the club, versus any individuals imposing their interests on others.
  • Accomplishing common objectives leads to good feelings.

Aside from the club’s modelling efforts, the WRMRC hosts regular operating sessions which involves duplicating the operations of the CP Rail Sudbury Division. Trains are operated with 2-man crews (engineman & conductor), and communicate between themselves and isolated dispatchers via radio. Real freight and passenger schedules are followed, along with proper blocking of freight traffic between trains. Freight delivery is governed by a car-card and waybill system which mimics the prototypical generation of traffic by railway customers. In short, the Sudbury Division is operated as a miniature transportation system.

Additional benefits to joining the WRMRC include the opportunity to build, kitbash, paint and weather models with the help and guidance from our more experienced modellers, along with access to the club’s professional painting facilities.

As an added incentive we offer your first month of membership free. This allows you to join in on our regular work nights and participate in an operating session, and make sure the WRMRC is right for you.

For more information about membership, or the WRMRC in general please send us e-mail.

Come and be a part of the action – Join the Waterloo Regional Model Railway Club.

Recent Posts

Old Soldiers

CP_8448

CP # 8448 leads the Espanola Turn through Nairn Ont. in the summer of 1973. In reality; this is a Van Hobbies brass model rebuilt with a Kato RS-3 drive. It is equipped with an ESU LokSound decoder with a 12-cylinder 244 diesel sound file.

Years after most other major North American railways purged their rosters of 244-powered ALCO diesels, CP Rail continued to employ a good-sized fleet of them throughout the ‘70s. Mainly due to chronic motive power shortages, and maybe a little by their corporate desire to milk locomotives for every mile they could to ensure their return on investment; the CPR would continue to operate 244-powered units until 1982.

In this light we find a pair of old soldiers in charge of the Espanola Turn on the CP Webbwood Sub, continuing to battle friction and gravity in defiance of the scrapper’s torch.

CP #8448, built by MLW in 1954, is noteworthy for being the second-last RS-3 to wear maroon and gray paint. She would eventually receive a new coat of Action Red in 1975, only to be retired the following year due to a major mechanical failure.

RS-10 #8464 fared a little better. Rolling out of MLW later the same year as sister #8448, she would persevere to the end of the decade. It should be noted that regardless of the differences in exterior appearance, the RS-10 is mechanically the same as an RS-3.

The model 244-diesel prime mover may have been plagued with reliability issues and earned a notorious reputation as a maintenance hog, but they endure at the time-warp known at the WRMRC – CP Sudbury Division layout. Here the 1970s never ended, and the burbling sounds of 244 diesels continue to echo throughout the Sudbury Basin.

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