Sudbury Division Train Number of the 1970s

Trains of the Sudbury Division in the 1970s

Passenger
Symbol Origin Destination Notes
1 Montreal, QC Vancouver, BC “The Canadian”
2 Vancouver, BC Montreal, QC “The Canadian”
11 Toronto, ON Sudbury, ON “The Canadian” – Toronto Section
12 Sudbury, ON Toronto, ON “The Canadian” – Toronto Section
417 Sudbury, ON White River, ON White River Budd RDC run
418 White River, ON Sudbury, ON White River Budd RDC run
427 Sudbury, ON Sault Ste Marie, ON S.S.Marie Budd RDC run
428 Sault Ste Marie, ON Sudbury, ON S.S.Marie Budd RDC run
Inter-Division Freights
Symbol Origin Destination Notes
901 Toronto, ON (Parkdale) Vancouver, BC (Coquitlam) Intermodal, express & Autorack train
902 Vancouver, BC (Coquitlam) Toronto, ON (Parkdale) Intermodal, express & Autorack train
911 Montreal, QC (St Luc) Sault Ste Marie, ON Manifest – Connects with SOO #911 to Schiller Park,IL (Chicago)
912 Sault Ste Marie, ON North Bay, ON Manifest – Traffic east of North Bay lifted by # 952
921 Toronto, ON (Agincourt) Winnipeg, MB Pool (l.c.l.), Intermodal & Manifest traffic
925 Montreal, QC (St Luc) Thunder Bay, ON Manifest. Replaced 951 in 1975.
946 Winnipeg, MB Toronto, ON (Agincourt) Stock (in season) & Manifest (paper loads and eastern empties). Replaced in 1975 by 956.
949 St.John, NB (Bayshore) Calgary, AB (Alyth) Intermodal/Pool/Perishables – via Chalk River line from Montreal
951 Montreal, QC (St Luc) Vancouver, BC (Coquitlam) Pool/Intermodal/Manifest – lifts west of Winnipeg traffic off 921 & 953. Replaced by 925 in 1975.
952 Calgary, AB (Alyth) St.John, NB (Lancaster) Intermodal/Perishables/Autorack train – via Chalk River line to Montreal
953 Toronto, ON (Agincourt) Winnipeg, MB Pool (l.c.l.), Autorack & Manifest. Runs as required with overflow from 921 and 965. Extended to Calgary in 1975.
954 Calgary, AB (Alyth) Toronto, ON (Agincourt) Pool (l.c.l.), Stock & Manifest. Handles overflow from 902 and 952; sets off Montreal/East and Sudbury traffic at Cartier for #974
955 Toronto, ON (Agincourt) Sudbury, ON Manifest (local cars for Sudbury & North Bay area)
956 Winnipeg, MB Toronto, ON (Agincourt) Pool (l.c.l.) & Manifest. Replaced 946 in 1975.
965 Toronto, ON (Agincourt) Vancouver, BC (Coquitlam) Intermodal, Autorack & Pool (l.c.l.) traffic
974 Cartier, ON Montreal, QC (St Luc) Manifest (Montreal set-off from # 954)
P.A.T. Toronto, ON (Agincourt) Vancouver, BC (Coquitlam) “Pacific Auto Train” semi-daily unit autorack train
Local Freights & Turn Jobs
Symbol Origin Destination Notes
50 Sudbury, ON Toronto, ON (Agincourt) Counterpart to # 955, mainly empties, listed on CP freight schedules
73 Sudbury, ON Little Current, ON Recovered INCO iron ore in coal hoppers to Turner docks
74 Little Current, ON Sudbury, ON Coal from Turner docks, 73/74 nicknamed the “Coal Train”
96 Webbwood, ON Sudbury, ON Extension of Thessalon Sub. local # 88 – a SOO/Sudbury swing job
Espanola Sudbury, ON Espanola, ON (E.B.Eddy) Turn job exclusively for E.B.Eddy paper plant in Espanola
The “Falcon” Sudbury, ON Falconbridge, ON Turn job exclusively for Falconbridge Inc.
Sturgeon Falls North Bay, ON Sturgeon Falls, ON Turn job exclusively for Abitibi-Price plant in Sturgeon Falls
INCO Job#1 Sudbury, ON Creighton Mine (INCO) INCO Clarabelle-Creighton nickel/copper ore shuttle
INCO Job#2 Sudbury, ON Crean Hill Mine (INCO) INCO Clarabelle-Crean Hill nickel/copper ore shuttle
INCO Job#3 Sudbury, ON Levack Mine (INCO) INCO Levack-Sprecher nickel/copper ore shuttle
Strathcona Turn Sudbury, ON Strathcona Mine (Falconbridge) Falconbridge – nickel concentrate & matt hoppers
Unit Trains *
Train Origin Destination Notes
Pulp Train Cartier (Ramsey), ON Nairn, ON (E.B.Eddy) Turn job – tree length pulpwood for Eddy plant at Nairn Centre
Kidd Creek Acid North Bay, ON Various Unit sulphuric acid off ONR to various destinations
Copper Cliff Acid Sudbury, ON Various Unit sulphuric acid from INCO to various destinations
Grain Extras Thunder Bay, ON Quebec,QC (or) St.John, NB Winter Only – during St.Lawrence Seaway shutdown
Potash Extras Various (Western Canada) Various (Southern Ontario) Seasonal movements from various mines to farm co-ops in Ontario

* (Note:
symbols were given to these trains, but they were often unused by crews
or dispatchers)

Recent Posts

Signalling the Sudbury Division

Since our club’s initial decision to model the CP Sudbury Division in the 1970s era, it was understood by the membership that at some point railway signals would need to be installed on the layout. Not only did we want our layout scenes to look close to their real place counterparts despite having to selectively compress them, or operate equipment that appeared just like what really ran through northern Ontario in the ’70s, but we also wished to operate the layout in a realistic manner too.

The CP Cartier Subdivision between North Bay and Cartier was all CTC (Centralized Traffic Control) territory during the 1970s, with the exception of the six mile double-track section between Romford and Sudbury yard which was ABS (Automatic Block Signal System) signalled in one direction for current of traffic. Regardless of the two signalling methods it meant the club’s entire east-west mainline was protected by signals, and therefore we would need to duplicate this if we wished to achieve our goals of both looking right, and running right.

That said, we can report that signalling a model railway is very much more easier said than done. However after 20 years of planning, and of delaying a lot of scenery work from being started due to the wiring and complexity of the project, the 1/87 scale Sudbury Division is seeing its first signals begin to sprout around the layout.

RomfordSignals01

Temporary dual-head and permanent dwarf signals installed at Romford. Once fully programmed they will protect this busy junction just like their real-life counterparts.

Though much of the hobby has progressed quite dramatically over the past 40 years, sadly the process of signalling a layout has lagged behind despite the pioneering efforts of Allen MccLelland’s V&O, or Bruce Chubb’s Sunset Valley back in the 1970s. Yes, there are multiple sources of hardware available, and JMRI (Java Model Railroad Interface) software is free, however none of this is really plug and play. You need to program signal scripts and modify JMRI for any of this to work. Between knowing where the signals need to be installed, planning and wiring the signal blocks accordingly, selecting the detectors, switch and signal controllers and then programming it all to work, there is one other big problem for us. No one out there offers ready-to-run Canadian-style searchlight signals.

Romford, ON in October 6, 1971

From the cab of ‘The Canadian’ at Romford, ON – 06 October 1971. Photo by Roger Puta, from Marty Bernard’s Flickr album.

Though searchlight signal kits do exist in HO scale, they are US-based and need to be disassembled and pretty much scratch-build to have them appear like the real deal did. This and both CP and CN did have some differences in their ladder assemblies. For this reason, the WRMRC has decided to build their own, and to use temporary signals in the meantime. But it sure would be nice if a Canadian model manufacturer considered reproducing them for HO modellers at some point. Hello Rapido; wink, wink, nudge, nudge!

RomfordSignals02

Westbound signals guarding Romford. The mainline is on the right. The wye tracks to the left connect with the Parry Sound Sub to Toronto. The track in the middle is a set-off siding.

There is also the little wrinkle of the dispatcher needing a CTC panel for this all to work. However the good news for the WRMRC is the CP Cartier Sub was signalled in the 1960s, and thus never used one of the ‘classic’ CTC panels that railfans usually imagine. CP had their own hybrid system housed on the second floor of the Sudbury Division HQ building, featuring a large white wall panel with a black trackage schematic, and yellow lights displaying track occupancy. The dispatcher set switches and direction of traffic with a keypad assembly. Frankly, this sounds a lot like something you can duplicate on a computer screen and controlled with a keyboard, and so that’s exactly what we will be doing.

RomfordSignals03

Temporary dual-head signals protect the CP Cartier Sub diamond crossing with the CN Bala Sub at Coniston, Ontario. The diamond, much like our signals, is a work in progress.

Regardless of all these difficulties, the WRMRC has a small team working on the project and they’ve been making great strides recently. As you can tell from the photographs, the layout is already looking dramatically different. We look forward to the day we can ‘un-bag’ these signals for a future operating session, and have our engineers operate their trains as per signal indication. This also means scenery can progress in these areas too. The WRMRC’s goals of ‘looking right’ and ‘running right’ are slowly being achieved.

 

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